Buone Feste: Christmas time in Italy

Christmas time in Italy is very special. From the beginning of the month (December 8, Day of the Immaculate Conception), christmas lights go out, and its truly a wonderful and magical time.

The streets are lined with bright lights, and trees, there is a palpable ‘merriness’ and there is a lot of FOOD!

Speaking of food – Italian desserts come out in the supermarkets, and cute christmas markets spring up selling all sorts of delicacies.

Italy is known for its Presepi – Nativity scenes, carefully hand crafted and decorating the streets, but its also a time for family, gathering together around the table.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Happy Christmas to all!

What is your favourite / unique tradition of Christmas where you are from?? (comment below!)

 

Also its my first time doing night time shots, any tips welcome!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Buone Feste: Christmas time in Italy

  1. Festivities here in the Netherlands start in early November with the arrival of Sinterklaas. For the next few weeks, until December 4/5, he drops off chocolate letters and pepernoten and other small gifts, until the gift night in December when the bigger gifts are delivered. There are usually special poems and such, as well. Christmas day is more low-key and not really about gifts, since they’ve already done that. Then on Second Christmas, one of the traditions is to have gourmetten for dinner (indoor grill pan you use at the table). Lots of fun!

    We’ve got beautiful lights throughout the cities, too, and Utrecht got some new lights this year. I still have to go out some evening and take some pictures. Speaking of which, to get night shots without the usual blur, try to brace yourself/your camera arm against something to keep the camera as steady as possible. Because of the low light, the lens has to stay open longer and any movement will cause blurriness. Lampposts and sides of buildings, or even a friend’s shoulder are good ways to create your own “tripod”. Your photos look lovely, though!

    Like

    • Hi Alison, thanks so much for the tips and the compliment :)!! I never thought of that before so I will definitely find something to lean on next time I go out and shoot! Also, thanks so much for your comment, I love learning about other cultures and how they do things. It’s interesting how some are food focussed, some gift, and some give gifts at different times etc. Very cool, Theodora

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s